February 1, 2023

Wire Service Canada

Complete Canadian News World

Electric cars: Switzerland is close to a driving ban. Sweden stops incentives

At a time when the European market seems to be adjusting to the idea of ​​electric cars, there is news going in the opposite direction. In fact, to deal with the expected energy crisis, Switzerland has studied a series of measures that also affect mobility, among other sectors. In particular, the bill passed by the Federal Council of the Swiss Confederation provides for a real driving ban for electric vehicles. With a few exceptions: spending, work, and medical issues.
Electric cars are in plain sight to lower energy costs
We remember that Switzerland produces a lot of energy from hydroelectric sources and nuclear power plants, but fears that winter could lead to significant reductions in production and supplies, hence the idea to ban more energy-intensive cars. But highway temperatures will also pay the price, as the proposal also calls for a further reduction of speed limits (currently, in some sections, 120 km/h) to 100 km/h to save fuel for emergency power generation allocation. And if that wasn’t enough, Alert 3 can be triggered with the thermostat lowered in households to 18°C ​​and washing machines, with wash cycles not exceeding 40°. After consultations with the various cantons, the final word will rest with the executive body of the Berne government, which will have to confirm the entry into force of the amendment by December 12.
Sweden: Stop incentives for electric cars
Electric cars are also in the sights of the Swedish government, which has removed incentives to buy electric cars.
The Eco Bonus was introduced in 2018 and consists of an incentive amounting to the equivalent of around 7,000 euros for those who buy electric cars. The government says that the penetration of electric cars is now about 50% of sales and the cost of an electric car is similar to that of a heat engine car, so it will not need government subsidies. The bonus discontinuation that began on November 8 may cause many buyers to change their minds and prefer a gasoline-powered car over an electric one.
A decision already taken by the Berlin government that from January 1, 2023 abolished the incentives for electrified cars, retaining only 100% (Bev), albeit in smaller quantities than now.