Sunday, April 14, 2024

Nobel Prize in Physics to Agostini, Krauss and Wheeler

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The Royal Academy of Sciences awarded three Pioneers of research into infinite smallness He developed the first tools to explore the world of atoms and molecules. Pierre Agostini, of French origins, works in the United States at Ohio State University; Hungarian Ferenc Krauss runs the Max Planck Institute for Quantum Optics in Germany, and Anne Lhuillier, also of French descent, works at Sweden’s Lund University.

Frenchwoman Anne Lhuillier is the fifth woman to win the Nobel Prize in Physics in more than a century. Among the 2023 winners is also a second Hungarian, Ferenc Kraus, a day after Katalin Karekó won the Nobel Prize in Medicine.

The first woman to win the Nobel Prize in Physics was Marie Curie, in 1903; 60 years later, it was the turn of Maria Goeppert Mayer (1963); There was still a long way to go before Donna Strickland was recognized in 2018, and two years later the Nobel Prize arrived for Andrea Ghez (2020); Three years later, it was the turn of another woman, the Frenchwoman Anne Lhuillier (65 years old).

Lhuillier was born in 1958 in Paris, and studied at the Pierre and Marie Curie University in Paris. From 1986 to 1993 he worked at the French Center for Nuclear Research in Saclay (France). In 1994 I moved to Sweden, to Lund University. He is a member of the Swedish Academy of Sciences and a foreign member of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States and of the Accademia Nazionale dei Lincei.

Ferenc Krausz (61 years old) was born in 1962 in Hungary, in Mór. He is the second Hungarian to win the Nobel Prize in 2023. . He studied in Vienna, where he obtained a doctorate from the Technological University in 1991; He currently lives in Germany, where he directs the Max Planck Institute for Quantum Optics in Garching and teaches at Ludwig Maximilian University in Munich.

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Frenchman Pierre Agostini studied at the University of Aix-Marseille, where he obtained his doctorate in 1968. He is an experimental physicist and currently lives and works in the United States at Ohio State University in Columbus.

Parisian, this discovery opened unexplored horizons

The 2023 Nobel Prize in Physics has opened new, unexplored horizons that could lead to applications that could have consequences in everyday life. This is how Giorgio Parisi, Nobel Prize laureate and Vice-President of the Académie de Linsay, comments on the award awarded today by the Swedish Academy of Sciences. “A huge and sincere satisfaction for the three new winners of the Nobel Prize in Physics, who with their studies have provided humanity with tools to explore the world of electrons inside atoms and molecules,” said Parisi, the 2021 laureate for his studies on complexity. He continued: “Their research opens up unexplored vistas of knowledge that will have repercussions on everyone’s lives.”

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Wynne Dinwiddie
Wynne Dinwiddie
"Infuriatingly humble alcohol fanatic. Unapologetic beer practitioner. Analyst."
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