September 30, 2022

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In Canada, the remains of 761 children were found in a former Catholic “tribal school” – Corriere.it

From Sarah Kandolfi

Hundreds of unnamed tombs – most of them children – have been unearthed at the Marywell Indian Residential School in Canada – making it Canada’s largest invention.

A terrifying new invention at a former college for aboriginal children and adolescents run by priests in Canada, another area that is changing A scandal is hard to ignore For that American Catholic Church Further For Pope reveals “pain” and “intimacy” to Canadian community in early June. Hundreds of anonymous graves have been found near the Marival Indian Residential School in the west of the country, where “guests” suffering from illness or other illness may have been buried. In total, there are 761 bodies, mostly children.

The scandal could soon spread to the United States, and its Secretary of the Interior recently announced the launch of an investigation into the complex legacy of Native American boarding schools, particularly the “human life and lasting effects” of exposing the truth about the “loss of life” to cemeteries or burial grounds. Forced to leave communities.

Announcement of the new “discovery of hundreds of unnamed graves in horror and shock” in Canada by the Cowessess community. The former school in Marivel, East Saskatchewan, was in operation until 1997 for 98 years. In May, excavations began shortly after the remains of 215 children were found near the Kamloops Indian Residential School. The so-called “Indian boarding schools”, a network of schools established by the government and run by the Catholic Church, forcibly removed tribal children from their communities in order to integrate them into the dominant “white” culture.

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“The number of unnamed cemeteries remains significant in Canada to date,” the Federation of Indigenous Sovereign States (FSIN) said in a statement.

“The pope’s apology will help the survivors embark on a journey of reconciliation,” Stephanie Scott, managing director of the National Center for Truth and Reconciliation, said in an interview with Korea, adding that the death toll could be as high as 6,000.

Following the discovery of human remains of Kamloops, excavations have begun at several former residential schools in the country with the help of government officials. In the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, they were colleges run by government and religious authorities with the aim of uniting tribal youth at any cost. Between 1863 and 1998, more than 150,000 tribal children were forcibly taken away from their homes and almost always enrolled in boarding schools, where they were barred from speaking or practicing the language of their communities.

A commission set up in 2008 to document the impact of the organization found that large numbers of tribal children did not return to their own communities. The Truth and Reconciliation Report, released in 2015, said the policy was tantamount to “cultural genocide.”

In 2008, the Canadian government formally apologized. No. of Leaders of the Catholic Church. In 2018, the Canadian Bishops’ Conference, in a letter to Native people, believed that Pope Francis could not “respond individually” to their request, but encouraged local bishops to pursue the path of reconciliation and unity with the local people. Communities.

The Missing Children program documents the graves of children who died on the way to school. To date, more than 4,100 children have been identified as having died while attending residential school.

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On the other hand, 50% of the complaints made to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission are related to serious physical and sexual abuse. Repeated rape cases, in most cases, led to the psychological devastation of the victim and then had a very long-term impact: inability to establish relationships with each other, mental illness, alcoholism, unemployment, inability to be good parents.

On June 5, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau called on the Catholic Church to “take responsibility” for its role in the abuses of boarding schools for Native children. The next day, Pope Francis confirmed that he had “painfully followed the news from Canada.” He then added: “We entrust to God the souls of all children who have died in residential schools in Canada, and we pray for Canadian tribal families and communities in distress. We pray silently. For his part, in recent days the Bishop of Montreal, Monsignor Christian Lebine, has issued a letter of apology on behalf of the Catholic Church, saying, “He spoke of the dark side of Canadian history, no man, no woman, no faith.

The people of the American first countries are still waiting for the formal apology of the Catholic Church.

June 24, 2021 (Change June 25, 2021 | 15:38)