May 20, 2022

Wire Service Canada

Complete Canadian News World

Canada: The government is silent on the rules for the purchase of “offensive” weapons

On 1 May 2020, surprisingly, the Prime Minister of Canada Justin Trudeau (Recently re-elected for his third term) released a rule he intended Prohibition on possession of approximately 1,500 model firearms, Qualified as “attack”. The rule sets a window period of up to April 30, 2022, By then the government must have adopted the necessary technical procedures for the repurchase of weapons held by citizens with comparative compensation, or so-called “grandfather” practice, allowing those who wish to continue to possess them.

To date, less than six months have passed since the exam deadline (in the blink of an eye, considering thousands or hundreds of thousands of civilians and weapons) However, the government is careful not to divulge information about this. The only signal given to those with legal weapons is the replacement of the Minister of Public Defense in the context of public government reform. Bill Blair (Believed to be the chief architect of the ban on weapons) with Marco Mendicino. Paradoxically, Blair lost the support of the unarmed unions because he was accused of failing to use what he intended to do.

It is unclear to this day how much the procedure for recalling weapons declared “attack” will cost Canadian taxpayers: a government report last June highlighted the spanometric estimate of 47 to 756 million. That is a “basic” estimate. In this regard, another country that has recently adopted a similar policy, viz New Zealand, 18 to over NZ $ 35, the total cost of the operation was almost double compared to initial estimates. The most realistic estimates have been drawn up by the Fraser Institute, which already in January 2020 (hence before the issuance of the Trudeau Order) assumed that such an operation would involve at least 250,000 weapons and cost from 1.6 to about 5. Billions of dollars in the first year alone, for pocket expenses incurred by the public administration, without adding compensation to the market value of the abducted citizens. Moreover, the Canadian Federation of Taxpayers continues to oppose the repurchase move, highlighting its nature as a simple waste of public money without any involvement in terms of social security. The same association illustrates how the withdrawal process cannot be completed by April 30, given the size of Canada’s population compared to New Zealand’s.

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