Tuesday, March 5, 2024

Bird flu: There is no place in Japan to bury slaughtered chickens

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More than 17 million birds have died this season, the largest in history.

The land shortage in Japan is hampering Mass execution Millions of birds due to a record outbreak of avian influenza. It was reported on Tuesday Public broadcaster NHK. More than 17 million birds have been culled in the Asian country this season due to bird flu 9% of domestic poultry, The highest number ever recorded. As many as 26 governorates (out of a total of 47) have been affected by the outbreak this season, 7 of which reported a lack of land suitable for burying animals.

Bird flu: There is no place in Japan to bury slaughtered chickens

Meanwhile, experts emphasized the urgent need to study new measures to prevent further spread of the virus by introducing cremation or reducing the number of birds to be slaughtered. this illness It is spread in various countries of the world, such as Japan, Cambodia, China and others. The World Health Organization (WHO) has warned that humanity should prepare for a scenario in which the avian influenza virus could unleash a new threat. pandemic. WHO data indicates that there were more than 860 confirmed cases of avian influenza in humans from 2003 to 2023. More than half of those infected are dead. In Latin America, Chile reported more than 1,500 dead sea lions during the first quarter of 2023. Specialists have linked these deaths to bird flu. H5N1. Meanwhile, the Chilean Ministry of Health confirmed it Last Wednesday, the first case of bird flu in humans. Avian influenza is a highly contagious viral disease that affects birds, especially poultry and farms. There are different strains of avian influenza viruses, some of which have the potential to infect animals, that is, they can also infect humans. Transmission occurs through direct contact with infected animals or with contaminated biological material. The disease can cause serious illness and death in birds and can have serious repercussions on the economy of the countries where it is spread.

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Wynne Dinwiddie
Wynne Dinwiddie
"Infuriatingly humble alcohol fanatic. Unapologetic beer practitioner. Analyst."
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