December 6, 2022

Wire Service Canada

Complete Canadian News World

Italian HDry technology for Canada Goose shoes

With the most recent launch of its first shoe collection, Canada Goose completes a range of products categorized by design aimed at performance and safety. For the waterproofing and breathable function, the Canadian brand relies HDry, A 100% Italian technologyDeveloped by Altexa from Busto Arsizio (Varese Province) specializing in the field of safety technology for clothing and footwear.

In winter models such as the Snow Mantra boot (the brand’s product Snow Mantra was born in Barca) and the Journey boot, the interior of the exterior is fully laminated. Special waterproof membrane This creates a complete blockage water barrier. The uniqueness of HDry technology compared to traditional membranes for shoes lies in the specific 3D direct lamination process of the lamination, i.e. a ‘micro-point’ adhesion of the membrane to the inner surface of the surface, when it is already sewn together, with the hooks and hinges used.

This is made possible by a specialized patented machine derived from technology The diaphragm develops Used on Space construction And allows to laminate even complex three-dimensional surfaces with high productivity. Exclusively for Italy and HDry, the Macpi of Brescia specializes in advanced technologies used for seamless clothing and footwear.

So the main advantage of HDry Prevents rain and frost At the outer level of the shoe, traditional systems with a waterproof membrane allow water to penetrate through the top, and then stop it only at the lining level, preventing it from reaching the foot, but causing weight gain. Heat loss of shoes.

In fact, thanks to the water and frost guaranteed by the new system designed to guarantee the highest level of protection even in the frozen tundra of northern Canada, the Snow magical model Tei certification (Thermal Experience Index) 5, is the highest and indicates that the boot is suitable to be worn to withstand extreme conditions such as -30 degrees Celsius in Arctic winter.