Sunday, March 3, 2024

In Tanzania, an education project to protect biodiversity

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Educating communities in Tanzania to learn about and enhance biodiversity: This is the goal of the Ambassadors of Nature launched by the non-profit SeedScience to engage and initiate projects to conserve some of the local animal and plant species from 300 students aged 13-18 years old living on the border between Morogoro and Pwani regions. .

explained Michelle Ragio, project coordinator and president of SeedScience, an association of volunteers active for years in Africa to educate and train young generations in science and environmental protection. The new Nature Ambassadors project, Learning Without Borders, Conserving Within the Community, continues the work done in previous years in Tasmania by involving already trained young people and will also have the support of the international group of National Geographic Explorers. “As with all our projects – added Raggio – the main objective is to ensure that the local population acquires the knowledge and skills to independently carry out what we have started together.”

Two years of activity on the border between Morogoro and Pwani districts, an area rich in biodiversity, however, there is a strong need to educate the community on the value of those ecosystems. “All efforts by scientists to learn more about the world are worth nothing if they are done only to advance science,” said Tsiory Andrianavalona, ​​co-paleontologist with the SeedScience Project and co-founder of ExplorerHome Madagascar. “The main thing for us is to let future generations know about the work done and its value,” he added.

Wynne Dinwiddie
Wynne Dinwiddie
"Infuriatingly humble alcohol fanatic. Unapologetic beer practitioner. Analyst."
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