Saturday, March 2, 2024

Cremona evening – Camerata Salzburg enchants Boncelli. Applause to Koopmann, Terzi and Ottenshamer at the opening ceremony of “Spazio Spettacolare”

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from stage Ponchelli Theatre The first “A” of the new concert season sounded. thick bulletin board leads toAmazing spaceCremona is one of the big names in international concerts. On a legendary stage Tony Copeman on the podium Camerata Salzburg. The troupe, among the world’s most authoritative in Mozart’s repertoire, proposed a program entirely dedicated to the Austrian genius. The party started with symphony no. 20 in D major, K 133 Composed by 16 year old Amadeus. Just two years ago, on the same January days, the talented composer was already in Cremona sitting in one of Ponchielli’s boxes, then called the Teatro Nazari, as a guest of the Marquis Nazari who owned it. Koopman paints in small but sharp strokes a pictorial display of musical colours. The austerity of sound levels, both in linguistic and modern times, brings a symphony that is not in itself among the most esteemed of Salzburg’s geniuses to an almost disco listening level. Special mention, in the four movements that make up the symphony, to the dense and magical execution of theGoing.

To follow Concerto for Bassoon and Orchestra in B flat major, K 191/186eThe bassoonist is the protagonist Richard III Which offers a brilliant and not at all heavy reading, bringing to the stage an excellent technique aided by good taste in the skilful use of the retinote especially in the tempo of the first movement”cheeryThe third has a warm, unobtrusive and very elegant voice. The applause given to the concert artist is well deserved.

It’s good to play every now and then with the Italian crowdjoked the musician, who then presented the audience with an amusing version of the bassoon accompanied by the first pizza parts of the famous “Voi che sapi”, Cherubino’s aria from the opera Le Nozze di Figaro.

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Masonic Funeral Music in C minor, K 477/479a is one of Mozart’s most famous pages. Pasolini also used it in his Gospel According to Matthew, a composition of rare beauty. The Koopman-led orchestra finds its strength in the balance of sound levels, subtly bringing out the thematic material suggested by the various instruments.

In conclusion, the team suggested Concerto for Clarinet and Orchestra in Major, C. 622first soloist for clarinet of the Wiener Philarmoniker Daniel Otensamer.

The piece was originally composed for the basset clarinet, an instrument with a sound range slightly lower than the B flat clarinet in use today. The original manuscript has been lost, but after Mozart’s death, the score in use today was recorded and adapted for the clarinet in common use, which is called the soprano clarinet. The Ottensamer spins his instruments as if he were a Roberto Ball and leaves you disarmed with the standardized management of registers and with the ease with which he expresses the most difficult passages in Mozart’s score. Ovation for those who decided to make an exception to the rule (which would include a public piece for the final encore) with the permission of the konzertmeister and suggested an improvisation of the rare beauty.

Led by the marble ideas of Ton Koopman, the Salzburg Camerata proposed a textbook concert, with that unmistakable voice that we are all engraved in memory. A concert that managed to give the audience the beauty of Mozart’s music with that executional quality, that depth, that amazing sound that only ensembles like this can deliver in a truly convincing way. The opening night of the concert season opened its doors to great success. And you know, who starts well…

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Photo service Gianpaolo Guarneri / Studio B12

Wynne Dinwiddie
Wynne Dinwiddie
"Infuriatingly humble alcohol fanatic. Unapologetic beer practitioner. Analyst."
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